#besthomehealth

Best Home Health Abilene TX | Rose Park | Wellness Jamboree

Posted on Updated on


Hands of Compassion Abilene location Gold Sponsors at Rose Park Senior Center.

 

Nicole Barnett RN,MSN and Stacey Wesney Accounts Executive

The theme of this year’s Rose Park Wellness Jamboree was: Dun Ta Dun Dun Ta Dun Ta….

May the 4th Be With You!



Our Accounts Executive Manager Chris Crockett said the place was packed with eager Senior Citizens seeking Wellness and goodies!
 Here are some tips you can pass along to that special elderly person in your life: 

Did you know that Walnuts and Sunflower Seeds have been linked to boost memory?

Here is a shopping list to assist you or your forgetful loved one:


We had so much fun yesterday! 
  
Hands of Compassion would like to express our gratitude to Rose Park Senior Center for inviting us to their annual Wellness Jamboree!

To view our online press release Click Here

And our Podcast Click Here

If you or your loved one requires in home assistance privately or skilled call us first!

325-691-1093

http://www.hochomecare.com

 Follow our blog and stay tuned because we are always posting some cool stuff on Facebook!

HOC HOMECARE

#Besthomehealth

 

Advertisements

November National Home Care Month| Best Home Health Midland Tx| Abilene TX 

Posted on Updated on

IMG_7413Happy Home Care Month!
November is National Home Care Month!
HOC Homecare recognizes the dedication, compassion and skill of all home care workers across America!

IMG_6985

There are over 70 million baby boomers who are retiring and soon to retire; these staggering numbers, coupled with today’s extended life spans, means there will be need for a lot of caregivers. The value of caregivers who help elderly persons cannot be measured. Independence and the ability to remain at home are two of the most important things to the aging senior adult.

IMG_7414

It’s true that aging adults prefer to remain in their own homes. They may just need a little help around the home in order to retain their independence, or maybe they have a medical condition that requires a visiting nurse to observe and assess their status. An elderly adult returning from hospital or recovering from an accident or surgery might require occupational or physical therapy.

IMG_7419

When compared to living in a facility, home care offers a greater level of independence to the senior adult. The caregiver is there to help and give assistance when needed, or to encourage the adult to do as much as possible. Sometimes all that’s needed is a little assistance. The caregiver can give as much or as little as the senior adult desires. Being able to stay at home as opposed to being put into institutionalized care is a level of independence all its own.

 

IMG_7417

Home care has become the most popular choice of care for the senior adult. The high cost of assisted living and other long-term institutional care options combined with the long waiting lists to get in has got more families looking into the home care solutions. In surveys, most senior adults expressed their desire to age at home in familiar surroundings. Home care fits perfectly for these aging seniors.

IMG_7426.JPG

 

There is also the factor that home care comes in all levels, from daytime only to around the clock care; from part time to fulltime, from home care to health care. The flexibility of care type makes it a very appealing choice.

IMG_7416-0

National Home Care Month also honors all those who assist the elderly senior stay in their own home.

IMG_7418
Did you know that Florence Nightingale in addition to her role in initiating nursing education programs, was also involved in developing nursing for the sick poor at home and in workhouses through her work for poor law and workhouse reform of the 1860s.
Yes!
We are very thankful for her contributions in public health.

At Hands of Compassion we

IMG_7422
agree with Florence Nightingale and deliver care to many who can not afford to pay and some whom have been treated as lepers….

IMG_7421

It is your right to age gracefully in the comfort of your home when possible.
We appreciate all of the HOC Homecare team for all they do 365 days of the year (rain,snow,sleet,or shine.)

IMG_7420

Just like the mailman our job must go on… 😁

And we do it with grateful hearts as we honor and serve with dignity those who have earned the Home health benefit.

IMG_7425

(Pictured above: Some Hoc Homecare staff celebrating with a song we made last year for Home Care Month/ Top Agency five Years in a row to view the video go here )

If you or an aging loved one are considering home care services please contact
Hands of Compassion Home Care,Inc today.IMG_7423

We have a nurse on call 24/7… 1-877-219-7996

Like us on Facebook we are always posting some phenom stuff! http://www.facebook.com/HandsofCompassion and http://www.facebook.com/HOCAbilene

“STAND DOWN” Welcome Home Veterans

Posted on Updated on

standdown

The Permian Basin Military Parnters Coalition presents ” STAND DOWN” A Veternas Benefits and Resource Fair.

#HOC Hands of Compassion is Calling all Veterans to come participate in this amazing event.  Come see us this Saturday!

Saturday – June 27, 2015 From: 0830-1600

Place: VFW Post 4149

409 Vetrerans Airpark Lane Midland TX 79705

Michael L. Kiefer, MHA, FACHE Director, West Texas VA Health Care System will present ” Homeless Veteran Summit” at 0830-0900

Several FREE Services will be provided for Veterans and their Family members:

  • Medical Services & Screenings
  • Men’s and Women’s Haircuts
  • VA Claims Information & Assistance
  • Counseling Services and Referrals
  • Employment Resources and much much more.

Lunch will be provided!

vapic

COME BE A PART OF THIS EVENT VETERANS AND WELCOME HOME!!!!

Special thanks to Military Veterans Peer Network, VFW Post 4149, US Dept. of Veteran Affairs, Midland Vet Center, Veterans Health Admin.

For additional information or transportation please call:

Brenda Bragg at (432) 213-3718 or Donnie Robinson at (432) 466-4911.

About Hands of Compassion

Hands of Compassion, a Medicare certified, CHAP accredited, repeat Homecare Elite Top Agency recipient, and provides compassionate care to qualified elderly and disabled persons. Services provided include: Skilled Nursing, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Home Health Aides and Companions. They serve 18 counties in the West Texas area. For the last 5 years Hands of Compassion was recognized by Homecare Elite, ocshomecare.com, which ranked them Top Agency for Positive Patient Outcomes in the nation. “Healthcare that unites hands with hearts.”

Contact Hands of Compassion Home Care serving West Texas at (432) 218-7996 or visit HOC’s website http://www.hochomecare.com. #GOHOCGO #VETERANS #VFWPOST4149  #WELCOME HOME #PermianBasinMilitaryPartnersCoalition

HOC Logo png

#SPEECHLESS! A day without being able to speak.

Posted on Updated on

national-aphasia

Language is much more than words. It involves our ability to recognize and use words and sentences. Much of this capability resides in the left hemisphere of the brain.

Through language, we:

  • Communicate our inner thoughts, desires, intentions and motivations.
  • Understand what others say to us.
  • Ask questions.
  • Give commands.
  • Comment and interchange.
  • Listen.
  • Speak.
  • Read.
  • Write.

June is National Aphasia Awareness Month.  Most people are unaware of what Aphasia is or how someone can become affected by Aphasia. According to the National Aphasia Association, Aphasia is an impairment of language, affecting the production or comprehension of speech and the ability to read or write. Aphasia is always due to injury to the brain-most commonly from a stroke, particularly in older individuals. But brain injuries resulting in aphasia may also arise from head trauma, from brain tumors, or from infections.

Aphasia can be so severe as to make communication with the patient almost impossible, or it can be very mild. It may affect mainly a single aspect of language use, such as the ability to retrieve the names of objects, or the ability to put words together into sentences, or the ability to read. More commonly, however, multiple aspects of communication are impaired, while some channels remain accessible for a limited exchange of information. It is the job of the professional to determine the amount of function available in each of the channels for the comprehension of language, and to assess the possibility that treatment might enhance the use of the channels that are available.

no image

Common Questions

What Causes Aphasia?
The most common cause of aphasia is stroke (about 25-40% of stroke survivors acquire aphasia). It can also result from head injury, brain tumor or other neurological causes.

How Common is Aphasia?
Aphasia affects about one million Americans -or 1 in 250 people- and is more common than Parkinson’s Disease, cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy. More than 200,000 Americans acquire the disorder each year. However, most people have never heard of it.

Who Acquires Aphasia?
While aphasia is most common among older people, it can occur in people of all ages, races, nationalities and gender.

Can a Person Have Aphasia Without Having a Physical Disability?
Yes, but many people with aphasia also have weakness or paralysis of their right leg and right arm. When a person acquires aphasia it is usually due to damage on the left side of the brain, which controls movements on the right side of the body.

Can People Who Have Aphasia Return to Their Jobs?
Sometimes. Since most jobs require speech and language skills, aphasia can make some types of work difficult. Individuals with mild or even moderate aphasia are sometimes able to work, but they may have to change jobs.

How Long Does it Take to Recover from Aphasia?
If the symptoms of aphasia last longer than two or three months after a stroke, a complete recovery is unlikely. However, it is important to note that some people continue to improve over a period of years and even decades. Improvement is a slow process that usually involves both helping the individual and family understand the nature of aphasia and learning compensatory strategies for communicating.

How Do You Communicate With a Person With Aphasia?
According to the Stroke Association following these simple suggestions can be very helpful.

  • It is important to make the distinction between language and intelligence.
  • Many people mistakenly think they are not as smart as they used to be.
  • Their problem is that they cannot use language to communicate what they know.
  • They can think, they just can’t say what they think.
  • They can remember familiar faces.
  • They can get from place to place.
  • They still have political opinions, for example.
  • They may still be able to play chess, for instance.

The challenge for all caregivers and health professionals is to provide people with aphasia a means to express what they know. Through intensive work in rehabilitation, gains can be made to avoid the frustration and isolation that aphasia can create.

Excerpted from the article “Talking Tough?”, Stroke Connection May/June 2004 (Last science update March 2013)

For most, a stroke has a startling and life-altering effect on both the survivor and family members. All involved find themselves trying to come to terms with changes ranging from physical and sensory loss to loss of speech and language.

For many survivors, this loss or change in speech (dysarthria, apraxia) and language (aphasia) profoundly alters their social life. Ironically, research has shown that socializing is one of the best ways to maximize stroke recovery. Many experts contend that socializing should begin right away in the recovery process.

For many people living with aphasia, dysarthria or apraxia, the question then becomes: How can they socialize if they can’t communicate the way they used to?

Family members can facilitate communication with some simple techniques:

  • Ask yes/no questions.
  • Paraphrase periodically during conversation.
  • Modify the length and complexity of conversations.
  • Use gestures to emphasize important points.
  • Establish a topic before beginning conversation.

Your environment also can help support successful socialization. Survivors have told us that it is easiest to begin practicing conversation in a one-on-one situation with someone they are comfortable with and who understands communication disorders.

In addition:

  • Practice conversation in a quiet, distraction-free environment.
  • As you become more confident, slowly add more conversational partners but continue to limit distractions such as background noise (music, other talking, TV).
  • As you become more comfortable in one-to-one or small group interactions, explore less-controlled social situations with your speech-language pathologist, close friends and family, or other stroke survivors.
  • Before you attend these gatherings, practice common things discussed in a variety of situations. For example, “How are you?” “It’s been a long time since I’ve seen you.”
  • Practice a few statements about current events: “Did you see the basketball game?” or “Boy, we are having beautiful weather!”
  • The more you practice this script, the greater your chances for success.
  • Family members can prepare written cues, or organize pictures to promote interactions

Does Aphasia Affect a Person’s Intelligence?
NO. A person with aphasia may have difficulty retrieving words and names, but the person’s intelligence is basically intact. Aphasia is not like Alzheimer’s disease; for people with aphasia it is the ability to access ideas and thoughts through language – not the ideas and thoughts themselves- that is disrupted. But because people with aphasia have difficulty communicating, others often mistakenly assume they are mentally ill or have mental retardation.

Are All Cases of Aphasia Alike?
No.There are many types of aphasia.Some people have difficulty speaking while others may struggle to follow a conversation. In some people, aphasia is fairly mild and you might not notice it right away. In other cases, it can be very severe, affecting speaking, writing, reading, and listening. While specific symptoms can vary greatly, what all people with aphasia have in common are difficulties in communicating.

Types of Aphasia:

  • Expressive aphasia (non-fluent): With expressive aphasia, the person knows what he or she wants to say, yet has difficulty communicating it to others. It doesn’t matter whether the person is trying to say or write what he or she is trying to communicate.
  • Receptive aphasia (fluent): With receptive aphasia, the person can hear a voice or read the print, but may not understand the meaning of the message. Oftentimes, someone with receptive aphasia takes language literally. Their own speech may be disturbed because they do not understand their own language.
  • Anomic aphasia. With anomic aphasia, the person has word-finding difficulties. This is called anomia. Because of the difficulties, the person struggles to find the right words for speaking and writing.
  • Global aphasia. This is the most severe type of aphasia. It is often seen right after someone has a stroke. With global aphasia, the person has difficulty speaking and understanding words. In addition, the person is unable to read or write.
  • Primary progressive aphasia. Primary progressive aphasia is a rare disorder where people slowly lose their ability to talk, read, write, and comprehend what they hear in conversation over a period of time. With a stroke, aphasia may improve with proper therapy. There is no treatment to reverse primary progressive aphasia. People with primary progressive aphasia are able to communicate in ways other than speech. For instance, they might use gestures. And many benefit from a combination of speech therapy and medications.

How is Aphasia Diagnosed?

Usually, a doctor first diagnoses aphasia when treating a patient for a stroke, brain injury, or tumor. Using a series of neurological tests, the doctor may ask the person questions. The doctor may also issue specific commands and ask the person to name different items or objects. The results of these tests help the doctor determine if the person has aphasia. They also help determine the severity of the aphasia.

How Is Aphasia Treated?

Treatment for someone with aphasia depends on factors such as:

  • Age
  • Cause of brain injury
  • Type of aphasia
  • Position and size of the brain lesion

For instance, a person with aphasia may have a brain tumor that’s affecting the language center of the brain. Surgery to treat the brain tumor may also improve the aphasia.

A person with aphasia who has had a stroke may benefit from sessions with a speech-language pathologist. The therapist will meet regularly with the person to increase his or her ability to speak and communicate. The therapist will also teach the person ways to communicate that don’t involve speech. This will help the person compensate for language difficulties.

Here are some tips from the National Stroke Association for someone with aphasia:

  • Use props to help get the message across.
  • Draw words or pictures on paper when trying to communicate.
  • Speak slowly and stay calm when talking.

Carry a card to let strangers know you have aphasia and what aphasia means.

About Hands of Compassion

Hands of Compassion, a Medicare certified, CHAP accredited, repeat Homecare Elite Top Agency recipient, and provides compassionate care to qualified elderly and disabled persons. Services provided include: Skilled Nursing, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Home Health Aides and Companions. They serve 18 counties in the West Texas area. For the last 5 years Hands of Compassion was recognized by Homecare Elite, ocshomecare.com, which ranked them Top Agency for Positive Patient Outcomes in the nation. “Healthcare that unites hands with hearts.”

Contact Hands of Compassion Home Care serving West Texas at (432) 218-7996 or visit HOC’s website atwww.hochomecare.com. #GOHOCGO #APHASIAAWARENESS #BESTHOMEHEALTH #JUNEISHERE 

HOC Logo png

Be Aware! Know the Signs of a #Stroke!

Posted on

May is Stroke Awareness Month.  A stroke is a disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. It is the No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States. A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts (or ruptures). When that happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood (and oxygen) it needs, so it and brain cells die. A stroke can be caused either by a clot obstructing the flow of blood to the brain (called an ischemic stroke) or by a blood vessel rupturing and preventing blood flow to the brain (called a hemorrhagic stroke). A TIA (transient ischemic attack), or “mini stroke”, is caused by a temporary clot. The brain is an extremely complex organ that controls various body functions.  If a stroke occurs and blood flow can’t reach the region that controls a particular body function, that part of the body won’t work as it should. 

Knowing the Risk Factors is an important step. Risk factors that we cannot change include: 

  • Age — The chance of having a stroke approximately doubles for each decade of life after age 55. While stroke is common among the elderly, a lot of people under 65 also have strokes.
  • Heredity (family history) — Your stroke risk may be greater if a parent, grandparent, sister or brother has had a stroke. 
  • Race — African-Americans (opens in new window) have a much higher risk of death from a stroke than Caucasians do. This is partly because blacks have higher risks of high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity.
  • Sex (gender) — Each year, women have more strokes than men, and stroke kills more women than men. Use of birth control pills, pregnancy, history of preeclampsia/eclampsia or gestational diabetes, oral contraceptive use, and smoking, and post-menopausal hormone therapy may pose special stroke risks for women. Be sure to discuss your specific risks with your doctor.
  • Prior stroke, TIA or heart attack — The risk of stroke for someone who has already had one is many times that of a person who has not. Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) are “warning strokes” that produce stroke-like symptoms but no lasting damage. TIAs are strong predictors of stroke. A person who’s had one or more TIAs is almost 10 times more likely to have a stroke than someone of the same age and sex who hasn’t. Recognizing and treating TIAs can reduce your risk of a major stroke. TIA should be considered a medical emergency and followed up immediately with a healthcare professional. If you’ve had a heart attack, you’re at higher risk of having a stroke, too.

Risk Factors that can be changed controlled or treated:

  • High blood pressure — High blood pressure is the leading cause of stroke and the most important controllable risk factor for stroke. Many people believe the effective treatment of high blood pressure is a key reason for the accelerated decline in the death rates for stroke.
  • Cigarette smoking — In recent years, studies have shown cigarette smoking to be an important risk factor for stroke. The nicotine and carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke damage the cardiovascular system in many ways. The use of oral contraceptives combined with cigarette smoking greatly increases stroke risk.
  • Diabetes mellitus — Diabetes is an independent risk factor for stroke.  Many people with diabetes also have high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and are overweight. This increases their risk even more. While diabetes is treatable, the presence of the disease still increases your risk of stroke.
  • Carotid or other artery disease — The carotid arteries in your neck supply blood to your brain. A carotid artery narrowed by fatty deposits from atherosclerosis (plaque buildups in artery walls) may become blocked by a blood clot. Carotid artery disease is also called carotid artery stenosis.  
  • Peripheral artery disease is the narrowing of blood vessels carrying blood to leg and arm muscles. It’s caused by fatty buildups of plaque in artery walls. People with peripheral artery disease have a higher risk of carotid artery disease, which raises their risk of stroke.
  • Atrial fibrillation — This heart rhythm disorder raises the risk for stroke. The heart’s upper chambers quiver instead of beating effectively, which can let the blood pool and clot. If a clot breaks off, enters the bloodstream and lodges in an artery leading to the brain, a stroke results.
  • Other heart disease — People with coronary heart disease or heart failure have a higher risk of stroke than those with hearts that work normally. Dilated cardiomyopathy (an enlarged heart), heart valve disease and some types of congenital heart defects also raise the risk of stroke.
  • Sickle cell disease (also called sickle cell anemia) — This is a genetic disorder that mainly affects African-American and Hispanic children. “Sickled” red blood cells are less able to carry oxygen to the body’s tissues and organs. These cells also tend to stick to blood vessel walls, which can block arteries to the brain and cause a stroke.
  • High blood cholesterol — People with high blood cholesterol have an increased risk for stroke. Also, it appears that low HDL (“good”) cholesterol is a risk factor for stroke in men, but more data are needed to verify its effect in women.
  • Poor diet — Diets high in saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol can raise blood cholesterol levels. Diets high in sodium (salt) can contribute to increased blood pressure. Diets with excess calories can contribute to obesity. Also, a diet containing five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day may reduce the risk of stroke (PDF opens in new window).
  • Physical inactivity and obesity — Being inactive, obese or both can increase your risk of high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease and stroke. So go on a brisk walk, take the stairs, and do whatever you can to make your life more active. Try to get a total of at least 30 minutes of activity on most or all days.

Be Prepared Know the Signs & Symptoms and Act F.A.S.T:

THINK YOU ARE HAVING A STROKE? CALL 9-1-1 IMMEDIATELY!

F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of stroke. When you can spot the signs, you’ll know that you need to call 9-1-1 for help right away. F.A.S.T. is:

F Face Drooping – Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person’s smile uneven?
A Arm Weakness – Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
S Speech Difficulty – Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like “The sky is blue.” Is the sentence repeated correctly?
T Time to call 9-1-1 – If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get the person to the hospital immediately. Check the time so you’ll know when the first symptoms appeared.

Beyond F.A.S.T. – Other Symptoms You Should Know

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the leg, arm or face
  • Sudden confusion or trouble understanding
     
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes  
     
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
     
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

If someone shows any of these symptoms, immediately call 9-1-1 or emergency.  Please visit the National Stroke Association at http://www.stroke.org or American Heart Association for additional information at http://www.strokeassociation.org or http://www.heart.org for additional information.  Remember to act #F.A.S.T!

About Hands of Compassion

Hands of Compassion, a Medicare certified, CHAP accredited, repeat Homecare Elite Top Agency recipient, and provides compassionate care to qualified elderly and disabled persons. Services provided include: Skilled Nursing, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Home Health Aides and Companions. They serve 18 counties in the West Texas area. For the last 5 years Hands of Compassion was recognized by Homecare Elite, ocshomecare.com, which ranked them Top Agency for Positive Patient Outcomes in the nation. “Healthcare that unites hands with hearts.”

Contact Hands of Compassion Home Care serving West Texas at (432) 218-7996 or visit HOC’s website atwww.hochomecare.com. #GOHOCGO #NURSESROCK #BESTHOMEHEALTHHOC Logo png

Keep Calm; Nurses Rock | Home Health Care Midland TX | Nurses Week 2015 #HOC

Posted on Updated on

Midland, TX, May 06, 2015— Hands of Compassion Home Care, Top Agency Nationwide, had the honor of celebrating National Nurse’s Week with some of the most impactful and hardworking nurses in the basin. National Nurses Week begins each year on May 6th and ends on May 12th, Florence Nightingale’s birthday.  As of 1998, May 8 was designated as National Student Nurses Day, to be celebrated annually. And as of 2003, National School Nurse Day is celebrated on the Wednesday within National Nurses Week (May 6-12) each year.

NationalNursesWeek_LOGOnodate400px

The nursing profession has been supported and promoted by the American Nurses Association (ANA) since 1896. Each of ANA’s state and territorial nurses associations promotes the profession at the state and regional levels. Each conducts celebrations on these dates to recognize the contributions that nurses and nursing make to the community. Here at H.O.C., it is no secret that we continually find special ways to show appreciation for all of our patients, doctors, partners and staff, of course our nurses are no exception.

For the past few years, Hands of Compassion Home Care has celebrated with their RNs, LVNs and CNAs during National Nurse’s Week just to remind them of their value and our gratitude.  This year we have opened up our celebration to our fellow nurses within the community.  H.O.C. invites you to join our celebration this year. H.O.C. values all of the clinical staff we work with on a daily basis and therefore we are showing our appreciation on this special day.

Keep Calm; Nurses Rock will be held on May 6th from 11am until 3pm. The location will be at the Beal Ranch House Park.   We invite all Nurses to come by and join us.

keep-calm-nurses-rock-1

Special Thanks to our Vendors: Enterprise Fleet Management, Midland Memorial Bariatrics, Silpada Designs, Integrity Massage, Midland College of Cosmetology, Endless Summer Tanning Salon, Janetta Olaseni with Youngevity.

For pictures on Nurses’ Week, blog posts and videos all dedicated to our great nurses, visit our website at: http://www.hochomecare.com OR

Visit our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/handsofcompassion

About Hands of Compassion

Hands of Compassion, a Medicare certified, CHAP accredited, repeat Homecare Elite Top Agency recipient, and provides compassionate care to qualified elderly and disabled persons. Services provided include: Skilled Nursing, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Home Health Aides and Companions. They serve 18 counties in the West Texas area. For the last 5 years Hands of Compassion was recognized by Homecare Elite, ocshomecare.com, which ranked them Top Agency for Positive Patient Outcomes in the nation. “Healthcare that unites hands with hearts.”

Contact Hands of Compassion Home Care serving West Texas at (432) 218-7996 or visit HOC’s website at www.hochomecare.com. #GOHOCGO #NURSESROCK #BESTHOMEHEALTH

HOC Logo png

Did you know that Kale has a Big Impact on Health if Eaten Daily?

Posted on

2014-09-05_072555

All You Need to Know About Kale Health

kale health

Kale is broccoli’s leafier cousin and it’s one of the most nutritious foods. This vegetable is also known as a great detox food because of its large amounts of fiber and sulfur, which play a role in detoxifying your body and keeping your liver healthy. However, there are more health benefits of kale that you may not know about.

Kale Health Benefits

1. Kale is low in calorie, high in fiber and has zero fat. One cup of kale has only 36 calories, 5 grams of fiber and 0 grams of fat. It is great for aiding in digestion and elimination with its great fiber content. It’s also filled with so many nutrients, vitamins, folate and magnesium as well as those listed below.

2. Kale is high in iron. Per calorie, kale has more iron than beef. Iron is essential for good health, such as the formation of hemoglobin and enzymes, transporting oxygen to various parts of the body, cell growth, proper liver function and more.

3. Kale is high in Vitamin K. Eating a diet high in Vitamin K can help protect against various cancers. It is also necessary for a wide variety of bodily functions including normal bone health and blood clotting. Also increased levels of vitamin K can help people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

4. Kale is filled with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants, such as carotenoids and flavonoids help protect against various cancers.

5. Kale is a great anti-inflammatory food. One cup of kale is filled with 10% of the RDA of omega-3 fatty acids, which help, fight against arthritis, asthma and autoimmune disorders.

6. Kale is great for cardiovascular support. Eating more kale can help lower cholesterol levels.

7. Kale is high in Vitamin A. Vitamin A is great for your vision, your skin as well as helping to prevent lung and oral cavity cancers.

8. Kale is high in Vitamin C. This is very helpful for your immune system, your metabolism and your hydration.

9. Kale is high in calcium. Per calorie, kale has more calcium than milk, which aids in preventing bone loss, preventing osteoporosis and maintaining a healthy metabolism. Vitamin C is also helpful to maintain cartilage and joint flexibility

10. Kale is a great detox food. Kale is filled with fiber and sulfur, both great for detoxifying your body and keeping your liver healthy.

Quick Kale Recipes

One of my Favorite Recipes for Cooking kale can be found here:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/sauteed-kale-recipe.html

BF_Sauteed-Kale-1_s4x3.jpg.rend.sni12col.landscape

Don’t like it Cooked?

Then add a few kale leaves to your daily juice recipe!

Add it to Salads or just munch on it raw!

If you liked learning some quick info on Kale and the many benefits please do share this with your friends!

Visit us at our Fanpage today!

Thank you for Visiting Hands of Compassion Home Care, Inc.

HOC Logo png